Recent Changes

Wednesday, August 6

  1. page home edited Welcome to the RE AP Physics B 2009-10 Wiki run by, and for, the students (with a little moderati…

    Welcome to the RE AP Physics B 2009-10 Wiki run by, and for, the students (with a little moderation from their teacher).
    ...
    this website was justhas been completed at
    http://physicsb-2013-14.wikispaces.com/
    Enjoy!
    (view changes)
    1:54 pm
  2. page home edited Welcome to the RE AP Physics B 2009-10 Wiki run by, and for, the students (with a little moderati…

    Welcome to the RE AP Physics B 2009-10 Wiki run by, and for, the students (with a little moderation from their teacher).
    ...
    this website is being made throughout the year (2013-14)was just completed at the
    http://physicsb-2013-14.wikispaces.com/
    Enjoy!
    (view changes)
    1:53 pm
  3. page home edited ... http://physicsb-2013-14.wikispaces.com/ Enjoy! AAPT High School Physics Photo Contest (samp…
    ...
    http://physicsb-2013-14.wikispaces.com/
    Enjoy!
    AAPT High School Physics Photo Contest (sample picture)
    First Place - Contrived (2009)
    Title: Where Sand Meets Sea
    Student: Kelsey Rose Weber
    School: Wildwood School, Los Angeles, California
    Teacher: Tengiz Bibilashvili
    {http://www.aapt.org/Contests/images/Photo09/C-210_normal.jpg} This photo was contrived by placing a transparent sphere against the beach horizon. By matching the refraction from the sphere with the point where the shoreline and skyline meet, this photo demonstrates the physics of refraction. By means of refraction, lenses form an image. The glass sphere in this photo acted as a lens causing the inverted image. This photo was taken at the Venice beach in Los Angeles, California and shows the beauty of combining physics with ones own natural surroundings.
    To link to more pictures from the contest and/or contest rules, just follow the link below
    (http://www.aapt.org/Contests/PhotoContest.cfm)

    The uses of this website will likely change a bit as the year goes on, but this site is meant to be your resource for this class. The main ideas are that:
    In creating links, finding pictures, and reorganizing notes, you will hopefully learn more about the material.
    (view changes)
    1:53 pm

Sunday, August 18

  1. page home edited Welcome to the RE AP Physics B 2009-10 Wiki run by, and for, the students (with a little moderati…

    Welcome to the RE AP Physics B 2009-10 Wiki run by, and for, the students (with a little moderation from their teacher).
    An improved version of this website is being made throughout the year (2013-14) at the following location:
    http://physicsb-2013-14.wikispaces.com/
    Enjoy!

    AAPT High School Physics Photo Contest (sample picture)
    First Place - Contrived (2009)
    (view changes)
    3:24 pm

Monday, October 15

  1. page (2) Kinematics edited ... Baumgartner videos and pictures: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2217915/Felix…
    ...
    Baumgartner videos and pictures:
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2217915/Felix-Baumgartner-headcam-video-It-like-Hell-terrifying.html
    article + videos (Baumgartner talking about drop): http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-19943590
    During this project, there were three high altitude jumps accomplished from a balloon-supported gondola; the first from 76,400 feet; the second from 74,700 feet 25 days later; and on Aug. 16, 1960, from 102,800 feet, the highest altitude from which man has ever jumped. It was Kittinger who did the jumping.
    In freefall for four and a half minutes, Kittinger fell at speeds over 700 mph, approaching the speed of sound. He experienced temperatures as low as -94 degrees Fahrenheit. Kittinger opened his parachute at 18,000 feet and landed safely in the New Mexico desert after a 13 minute 45 second descent. Project Excelsior successfully proved the new parachute system, the Beaupre Multi-Stage Parachute, would solve the problem of high altitude escape by crewmen.
    (view changes)
    4:03 pm
  2. page (2) Kinematics edited ... Kittinger talking through video: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/04/12/joe-kittinger-balloo…
    ...
    Kittinger talking through video: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/04/12/joe-kittinger-balloon-jump-space_n_847797.html
    Baumgartner article + video: http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-205_162-57532099/officials-say-skydiver-broke-the-speed-of-sound/
    Baumgartner spin: http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/video/2012/oct/15/felix-baumgartner-skydive-spin-video
    (uncontrollable spin)
    Baumgartner videos and pictures:
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2217915/Felix-Baumgartner-headcam-video-It-like-Hell-terrifying.html

    During this project, there were three high altitude jumps accomplished from a balloon-supported gondola; the first from 76,400 feet; the second from 74,700 feet 25 days later; and on Aug. 16, 1960, from 102,800 feet, the highest altitude from which man has ever jumped. It was Kittinger who did the jumping.
    In freefall for four and a half minutes, Kittinger fell at speeds over 700 mph, approaching the speed of sound. He experienced temperatures as low as -94 degrees Fahrenheit. Kittinger opened his parachute at 18,000 feet and landed safely in the New Mexico desert after a 13 minute 45 second descent. Project Excelsior successfully proved the new parachute system, the Beaupre Multi-Stage Parachute, would solve the problem of high altitude escape by crewmen.
    (view changes)
    3:49 pm
  3. page (2) Kinematics edited ... OLD VIDEO: http://techland.time.com/2010/01/22/video-joe-kittingers-102800-ft-descent/ Kittin…
    ...
    OLD VIDEO: http://techland.time.com/2010/01/22/video-joe-kittingers-102800-ft-descent/
    Kittinger talking through video: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/04/12/joe-kittinger-balloon-jump-space_n_847797.html
    Baumgartner article + video: http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-205_162-57532099/officials-say-skydiver-broke-the-speed-of-sound/
    During this project, there were three high altitude jumps accomplished from a balloon-supported gondola; the first from 76,400 feet; the second from 74,700 feet 25 days later; and on Aug. 16, 1960, from 102,800 feet, the highest altitude from which man has ever jumped. It was Kittinger who did the jumping.
    In freefall for four and a half minutes, Kittinger fell at speeds over 700 mph, approaching the speed of sound. He experienced temperatures as low as -94 degrees Fahrenheit. Kittinger opened his parachute at 18,000 feet and landed safely in the New Mexico desert after a 13 minute 45 second descent. Project Excelsior successfully proved the new parachute system, the Beaupre Multi-Stage Parachute, would solve the problem of high altitude escape by crewmen.
    (view changes)
    3:29 pm
  4. page (2) Kinematics edited ... other link (longer video): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qw8OJJQ_hgk&feature=related OLD…
    ...
    other link (longer video): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qw8OJJQ_hgk&feature=related
    OLD VIDEO: http://techland.time.com/2010/01/22/video-joe-kittingers-102800-ft-descent/
    Kittinger talking through video: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/04/12/joe-kittinger-balloon-jump-space_n_847797.html
    During this project, there were three high altitude jumps accomplished from a balloon-supported gondola; the first from 76,400 feet; the second from 74,700 feet 25 days later; and on Aug. 16, 1960, from 102,800 feet, the highest altitude from which man has ever jumped. It was Kittinger who did the jumping.
    In freefall for four and a half minutes, Kittinger fell at speeds over 700 mph, approaching the speed of sound. He experienced temperatures as low as -94 degrees Fahrenheit. Kittinger opened his parachute at 18,000 feet and landed safely in the New Mexico desert after a 13 minute 45 second descent. Project Excelsior successfully proved the new parachute system, the Beaupre Multi-Stage Parachute, would solve the problem of high altitude escape by crewmen.
    (view changes)
    3:08 pm
  5. page (2) Kinematics edited ... New video link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=90Y0_iJrRl0 other link (longer video): http://…
    ...
    New video link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=90Y0_iJrRl0
    other link (longer video): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qw8OJJQ_hgk&feature=related
    OLD VIDEO: http://techland.time.com/2010/01/22/video-joe-kittingers-102800-ft-descent/
    During this project, there were three high altitude jumps accomplished from a balloon-supported gondola; the first from 76,400 feet; the second from 74,700 feet 25 days later; and on Aug. 16, 1960, from 102,800 feet, the highest altitude from which man has ever jumped. It was Kittinger who did the jumping.
    In freefall for four and a half minutes, Kittinger fell at speeds over 700 mph, approaching the speed of sound. He experienced temperatures as low as -94 degrees Fahrenheit. Kittinger opened his parachute at 18,000 feet and landed safely in the New Mexico desert after a 13 minute 45 second descent. Project Excelsior successfully proved the new parachute system, the Beaupre Multi-Stage Parachute, would solve the problem of high altitude escape by crewmen.
    (view changes)
    2:57 pm
  6. page (2) Kinematics edited ... Position vs. Time GraphsPosition vs. time graphs give you an easy and obvious way of determini…
    ...
    Position vs. Time GraphsPosition vs. time graphs give you an easy and obvious way of determining an object’s displacement at any given time, and a subtler way of determining that object’s velocity at any given time.
    {http://img.sparknotes.com/content/testprep/bookimgs/sat2/physics/0017/YvsTgraph.gif} Any point on this graph gives us the position of the object at a particular moment in time. For instance, the point at (2,–2) tells us that, two seconds after it started moving, the object was two centimeters to the left of its starting position, and the point at (3,1) tells us that, three seconds after it started moving, the object is one centimeter to the right of its starting position.Let’s read what the graph can tell us about the object’s movements. For the first two seconds, the object is moving to the left. Then, in the next second, it reverses its direction and moves quickly to y = 1. The object then stays still at y = 1 for three seconds before it turns left again and moves back to where it started.Calculating VelocityWe know the object’s displacement, and we know how long it takes to move from place to place. Armed with this information, we should also be able to determine the object’s velocity, since velocity measures the rate of change of displacement over time. If displacement is given here by the vector y, then the velocity of the ant is
    {http://img.sparknotes.com/content/testprep/bookimgs/sat2/physics/0027/phy.total77.gif}
    If
    If you recall,
    {http://img.sparknotes.com/content/testprep/bookimgs/sat2/physics/0010/NEWNEWvelocity.gif} Average VelocityHow about the average velocity between t = 0 and t = 3? It’s actually easier to sort this out with a graph in front of us, because it’s easy to see the displacement at t = 0 andt = 3, and so that we don’t confuse displacement and distance.
    {http://img.sparknotes.com/content/testprep/bookimgs/sat2/physics/0010/NEWavg.vel=ch.gif} Average SpeedAlthough the total displacement in the first three seconds is one centimeter to the right, the total distance traveled is two centimeters to the left, and then three centimeters to the right, for a grand total of five centimeters. Thus, the average speed is not the same as the average velocity of the object. Once we’ve calculated the total distance traveled by the object, though, calculating its average speed is not difficult:
    ...
    (Project Excelsior was a series of high-altitude parachute jumps made by Colonel Joseph Kittinger Jr.)
    New video link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=90Y0_iJrRl0
    other link (longer video): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qw8OJJQ_hgk&feature=related
    During this project, there were three high altitude jumps accomplished from a balloon-supported gondola; the first from 76,400 feet; the second from 74,700 feet 25 days later; and on Aug. 16, 1960, from 102,800 feet, the highest altitude from which man has ever jumped. It was Kittinger who did the jumping.
    In freefall for four and a half minutes, Kittinger fell at speeds over 700 mph, approaching the speed of sound. He experienced temperatures as low as -94 degrees Fahrenheit. Kittinger opened his parachute at 18,000 feet and landed safely in the New Mexico desert after a 13 minute 45 second descent. Project Excelsior successfully proved the new parachute system, the Beaupre Multi-Stage Parachute, would solve the problem of high altitude escape by crewmen.
    (view changes)
    2:50 pm

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